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Social Sciences Examples of learning outcomes that would forward this goal:. Every institution in the USG will have a core curriculum of precisely 42 semester hours and an Area F of precisely 18 hours.

All students must meet the core requirements of the institutions from which they receive their degrees. However, see the rules regarding transfer credit in Section 2. The minimal for Areas D and E are lower than the hours required in these Areas in the core. This is not intended as a signal that institutions should reduce or increase the hours in these areas.

The intent is to put this matter in the hands of the faculty of individual institutions by roughly requiring two courses in each of Areas C—E. All courses in Areas A—E must be taught at the collegiate level and be broadly focused. They must clearly address the general education learning outcomes of the institution. Other approved courses may be placed in this area.

Effective Fall , for freshmen entering the USG system Fall , students who have earned 60 hours but have not completed Area A1 must enroll in the next course necessary to make progress toward completing this Area in every semester in which they take classes. Effective Fall , this hour limit is lowered to 45 hours for freshmen entering the USG system Fall , Spring , and Summer Effective Fall , the hour limit is lowered to 30 hours for freshmen entering the USG system Fall and thereafter.

For students with Learning Support requirements in English, taking the required Learning Support course counts as making progress toward completing Area A1. For students majoring in mathematics, physics, chemistry, biology, engineering technology, architecture, computer science, geology, geography B. Institutions may require pre-calculus in Area A2 for majors in agricultural science and environmental science.

While students may fulfill this requirement with a math course higher than pre-calculus, institutions may not require them to do so.

A calculus course is required in Area A2 for all engineering majors and for all programs at Georgia Institute of Technology. While students may fulfill this requirement with a math course higher than a first course in calculus, institutions may not require them to do so. At institutions where trigonometry serves as an immediate prerequisite for Calculus I, the completion of trigonometry will be regarded as completion of pre-calculus in Area A2.

Symbolic logic and math for liberal arts may not be used as substitutions for algebra or mathematical modeling in Area A2. Institutions or programs may grant one semester hour of credit for an Area A2 course to count in Area F or in the general degree requirements.

Effective Fall , for freshmen entering the USG system Fall , students who have earned 60 hours but have not completed Area A2 must enroll in the next course necessary to make progress toward completing this Area in every semester in which they take classes. Effective Fall , freshmen entering the USG system Fall and thereafter, the hour limit is lowered to 30 hours. For students with Learning Support requirements in mathematics, taking the required Learning Support course counts as making progress toward completing Area A2.

They must be analytic in nature and have a problem-solving component. An example of such a compelling case might be if the institution proposed to put 3 or more hours of math in Area B and 7 hours of natural science in Area D. Institutions may have Area D requirements specific to all science programs, but no science program may require that students take a particular science in Area D.

See the rules on prerequisites below. For example, institutions may not require that chemistry majors complete Area D with chemistry courses. Institutions or programs may grant one semester hour of credit for an Area D course to count in Area F or in the general degree requirements. Students in the health professions, including nursing, must fulfill the Area D science requirement with a two-semester laboratory sequence in either physics, chemistry, or biology. The only biology courses that may be used to fulfill this requirement are Introductory Biology designed for non-science majors and Principles of Biology designed for science majors.

Health professions majors have the option of taking the Survey of Chemistry sequence or the sequence appropriate for science majors, but they may not fulfill their Area D requirements with chemistry courses designed for non-science majors.

Non-science majors may use the Survey of Chemistry sequence to fulfill the Area D requirements, but it may not be used to fulfill the science requirements for science majors not in the health professions.

If course work is used to satisfy the U. Every institution must offer a path to completing all Area A—E requirements composed exclusively of and level courses.

Other approved and level courses may also be placed in Areas A—E. Orientation courses may not be placed in Areas A—F. Up to four hours of orientation courses may be required outside of Areas A—F in excess of the maximum number of hours indicated for undergraduate degrees. Transferring students taking orientation hours at one institution may be required to take additional orientation hours outside the maximum hours indicated for the undergraduate degree at the receiving institution.

Courses with a primary emphasis on studio, performance, field study, or internship may not be placed in Areas A—E. Institutions that decide that the first course in a foreign language falls outside of the maximum number of hours are not required to grant transfer credit for such courses but may do so if they wish.

Except as required by accrediting agencies, core curriculum credits do not have an expiration date. Institutions may not permit the completion of any course to fulfill requirements in more than one Area A—F.

Where the same course is authorized in more than one Area A—F, the student completing the course to meet the requirements of one area must take another course in the second area to meet the requirements of the second area.

Courses previously approved for use in Area A—F at an institution do not require re-approval for use at that institution. Learning outcomes and courses that are authorized for Area F must be established by the relevant Academic Advisory Committees.

Institutions must follow these guidelines when making changes to Area F requirements for their degree programs. Therefore, no approval is needed for institutions to add individual courses to Area F.

The respective Academic Advisory Committees must review their Area F guidelines and institutional offerings regularly to ensure institutional compliance with the Advisory Committee-approved guidelines. Advisory Committees will discuss perceived non-compliant Area Fs with the Chief Academic Officer of the impacted institution. Academic Advisory Committees must follow the process described below when making changes to the learning outcomes and course guidelines for their respective Area Fs.

Exception 1 If one particular course is required in order to complete an Area, that course may be a prerequisite for a course in another Area or for a course outside of Area A—E. Students in such degree programs will receive credit for the course in Area F, and this course may be a prerequisite for courses in Area F or the major. Unless required of all students in Area B or C, any foreign language courses approved for inclusion in Areas A — E must also be included in Area F for majors requiring foreign languages, so that foreign language courses included in Areas A — E do not become required prerequisites for Area F courses.

Exception 3 Institutions may require their students to complete their A2 requirements before taking math courses in Areas D and F. They may do so by making their A2 courses prerequisites for their math courses in Areas D and F. Exception 5 Institutions may apply for permission to specify that students in one or more of their degree programs are required to take particular courses within Areas A—E.

Institutions may apply for up to 9 hours of such requirements. Applications will be considered only if requiring particular courses in Areas A—E will allow the degree program to reduce the number of hours required for the degree. The courses required in Areas A—E must be available to and count in Areas A—E for all students, not just those in the degree program. Students switching from a non-science major to a science major must meet the Area A2 and Area D requirements for science majors even if they have already completed the Area A2 and Area D requirements for non-science majors.

Students in the USG must declare one home institution at a time. Students who transfer from one institution to another automatically change their home institution. Receiving institutions may require transfer students to complete the requirements as specified for native students.

However, the total number of hours required of transfer students for the degree must not exceed the number of hours required of native students for the same major. Students who wish to take Area A—F courses including distance learning courses from a USG institution other than the home institution, either concurrently or intermittently, may receive transient permission to take and receive credit for Areas A—F courses satisfying home institution Area A—F requirements.

The CTO is the contact person for students, faculty, advisors, records and admissions personnel, and academic administrators when problems related to transfer of Area A—F course work across USG institutions occur. However, CTOs should also be proactive and work to develop institutional procedures that minimize transfer problems. Students with questions or concerns about the transfer of credit between USG institutions should contact the CTO at the receiving institution.

Following are common course prefixes, numbers, and descriptions that all institutions shall use for their programs of study.

Communication Outcomes Examples of learning outcomes that would forward this goal: Students produce well-organized communication that meets conventional standards of correctness, exhibits an appropriate style, and presents substantial material. Students communicate effectively using appropriate writing conventions.

Students have the ability to assimilate, analyze, and present in oral and written forms, a body of information. Students have the ability to adapt communication to circumstances and audience. Students have the ability to interpret content of written materials on related topics from various disciplines. Students demonstrate an understanding of what constitutes plagiarism and acknowledge the use of information sources. Quantitative Outcomes Examples of learning outcomes that would forward this goal: Students have a strong foundation in mathematical concepts, processes, and structure.

Students effectively apply symbolic representations to model and solve problems. Students have the ability to model situations from a variety of settings in generalized mathematical forms. Students have the ability to express and manipulate mathematical information, concepts, and thoughts in verbal, numeric, graphical, and symbolic forms while solving a variety of problems. Students have the ability to solve multiple-step problems through different inductive, deductive, and symbolic modes of reasoning.

Humanities, Fine Arts, and Ethics Examples of learning outcomes that would forward this goal: Students can compare and contrast the meaning of major texts from both Western and non-Western cultures. Students recognize themselves as participants in a particular culture and see how this affects their experiences and values.

Students have the ability to make informed judgments about art forms from various cultures including their own culture. Students have the ability to recognize the fine arts as expressions of human experience. Students have the ability to critically appreciate historical and contemporary fine art forms as they relate to individual and social needs and values.

Students have the ability to apply knowledge of historical, social, and cultural influences to understanding a work of art. Students recognize that an ethical issue is present and can distinguish ethical choices from mere self-interest. Students are aware of the ways that culture shapes ethical views and can critically evaluate those views.

Natural Sciences, Mathematics, and Technology Examples of learning outcomes that would forward this goal: Students have the ability to understand the changing nature of science. Social Sciences Examples of learning outcomes that would forward this goal: Students have the ability to describe how historical, economic, political, social, and spatial relationships develop, persist, and change.

Students have the ability to articulate the complexity of human behavior as a function of the commonality and diversity within groups. At least 7 hours. At least 4 of these hours must be in a lab science course. E Social Sciences Courses that address learning outcomes in the social sciences At least 6 hours F Lower-Division Major Requirements Lower division courses required by the degree program and courses that are prerequisites to major courses at higher levels.

Science programs must require two four-hour laboratory science courses in Area D. Science programs may specify a higher level math course in Area D. Creative writing and technical communication courses may not be included in Area D. Courses in Areas A—F may not carry a fraction of a semester hour of credit. The proposed changes to Area F guidelines must be approved by the respective Academic Advisory Committee and submitted for consideration by the General Education Council.

If approved by RACAA, the Area F changes will be submitted to the Assistant Vice Chancellor for Academic Programs for revision of the academic programs website and implementation in the review of new program proposals. The degree program is in an area in which demand for graduates in Georgia significantly outstrips the supply, The degree program requires a special admission process beyond that required for admission to the institution, The degree program has an accreditation body that requires so many hours it is difficult to design a degree program that is hours without requiring particular courses in Areas A—E, and Graduates of the degree program must pass a certification or licensure exam before they can exercise the relevant profession.

It is one of many courses in Area C and is not required in the philosophy Area F and is a prerequisite for upper-level philosophy courses. This is not allowed. It is also required in the philosophy Area F and is a prerequisite for upper-level philosophy courses.

PSYCH is approved for use in the core according to the procedures noted in Exception 5 and counts towards Area E for all students. The solar system planets, satellites, and minor bodies.

The origin and evolution of the solar system. ASTR Stellar and Galactic Astronomy The study of the Sun and stars, their physical properties and evolution, interstellar matter, star clusters, our galaxy and other galaxies, and the origin and evolution of the Universe. The approved course descriptions shown for chemistry illustrate the use of the suffixes.

BUSA Introduction to Business An integrative study of the functional areas of business finance, operations, marketing, human resources, etc. BUSA Communicating in the Business Environment A course emphasizing both interpersonal and organizational communications; to include written and oral exercises appropriate to business practice.

BUSA The Environment of Business An introduction to the legal, regulatory, political, social, ethical, cultural environmental and technological issues which form the context for business; to include an overview of the impact and demographic diversity on organizations. CHEM Introductory Chemistry A one-semester course covering basic concepts and applications of chemistry designed for non-science majors.

There is no laboratory component. CHEM K Introductory Chemistry I First course in a two-semester sequence covering the basic principles and applications of chemistry designed for non-science majors.

Topics to be covered include atomic structure and isotopes, periodicity and chemical equations. Laboratory exercises supplement the lecture material. CHEM K Introductory Chemistry II Second course in a two-semester sequence covering the basic principles and applications of chemistry designed for non-science majors.

CHEM Introductory Chemistry I First course in a two-semester sequence covering the basic principles and applications of chemistry designed for non-science majors. CHEM Introductory Chemistry II Second course in a two-semester sequence covering the basic principles and applications of chemistry designed for non-science majors.

CHEM K Survey of Chemistry I First course in a two-semester sequence covering elementary principles of general, organic and biochemistry designed for allied health professions majors. Topics to be covered include elements and compounds, chemical equations, nomenclature, and molecular geometry. CHEM K Survey of Chemistry II Second course in a two-semester sequence covering elementary principles of general, organic and biochemistry designed for allied health professions majors.

CHEM Survey of Chemistry I First course in a two-semester sequence covering elementary principles of general, organic and biochemistry designed for allied health professions majors. CHEM Survey of Chemistry II Second course in a two-semester sequence covering elementary principles of general, organic and biochemistry designed for allied health professions majors.

CHEM K Principles of Chemistry I First course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry designed for science majors. Topics to be covered include composition of matter, stoichiometry, periodic relations, and nomenclature. CHEM K Principles of Chemistry II Second course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry designed for science majors.

CHEM Principles of Chemistry I First course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry designed for science majors. CHEM Principles of Chemistry II Second course in a two-semester sequence covering the fundamental principles and applications of chemistry designed for science majors. COM See Fine and Applied Arts CSCI Computer Science I The course includes an overview of computers and programming; problem solving and algorithm development; simple data types; arithmetic and logic operators; selection structures; repetition structures; text files; arrays one-and-two-dimensional ; procedural abstraction and software design; modular programming including subprograms or the equivalent.

CSCI Computer Science II The course includes an overview of abstract data types ADTs ; arrays multi-dimensional and records; sets and strings; binary files; searching and sorting; introductory algorithm analysis including Big-O ; recursion; pointers and linked lists; software engineering concepts; dynamic data structures stacks, queues, trees. ECON Principles of Macroeconomics This principles of economics course is intended to introduce students to concepts that will enable them to understand and analyze economic aggregates and evaluate economic policies.

ECON Principles of Microeconomics This principles of economics course is intended to introduce students to concepts that will enable them to understand and analyze structure and performance of the market economy. ENGL English Composition I A composition course focusing on skills required for effective writing in a variety of contexts, with emphasis on exposition, analysis, and argumentation, and also including introductory use of a variety of research skills. Studies have also shown that people with Maths A Level also tend to earn more on average than people without it.

Though this itself may or may not be a good enough reason to study maths, the skills it allows you to develop include problem solving, logic and analysing situations. This definitely makes it worth considering. Finally, you might also really like maths - this is as good a reason as any to continue studying it.

If you study something you enjoy you are likely to do better at it. With maths there is the excitement of new discoveries you will make. You will see more of the beauty of it and realise just how much everything around in the universe is connected to mathematics. The bottom line is, maths is an amazing subject to have at A Level and provided you have a solid understanding of the GCSE concepts before you start, alongside some perseverance and effort, you should be able to do well.

Mathematics A Level is almost always now taken as a modular course. Each module is specific to particular of areas of work, and the work slightly varies from exam board to exam board. In the links to specific modules below you will find textbook answers, textbook mistakes, and links to TSR where you can see how the community finds the module. Each one of these usually rests on the one before it, as do all the pure core units.

But the relationships between these areas can be different, and especially over the further pure units: Note that it has FP4 as well as FP In terms of its material, it is quite different from the other A-levels: There is some unique material e. And significantly, AQA has a coursework-and-exam option for M1 and S1 and before , M2 and S2 as well as well as an all-exam option where most boards do not.

It lacks coverage of certain statistical tests and the binomial and Poisson distributions. OCR A has the bare core of modules: There is no M5.

It is a FP1-as-AS specification. C3 has a compulsory coursework component to do with numerical methods such as the Newton-Raphson method, making MEI the only board with compulsory coursework in Maths or Further Maths. C4 has two papers, one of which is a comprehension with an article as an example of mathematical modelling. The extra modules are as follows: When you cash-in for one of the above awards, your individual modules marks from the required units as shown above will be combined and you will be given a mark out of for AS Level and for A2 Level.

In combining units for an awards, they will be selected in such a way where possible , so that you are awarded the highest grades possible using the most UMS marks for example: Before January , grades were awarded for getting the highest grade with the lowest amount of UMS marks in Maths.

This enabled units in which you got higher UMS marks to be used for a future qualification eg: However, if a U results in Further Maths and can be re-arranged, a request can be made to lower the Maths grade to bring up the Further Maths grade: Edexcel is modifying its specification slightly for the reform, and it will be available to students taking the A-level from January and summer onwards. FP2 and FP3 have had major changes amongst themselves too.

As for the Decision units, some D1 material has moved to D2 for balance - specifically flows in networks and the Simplex algorithm for linear programming.

This means that these changes not only hit the year group for all other new A-level subjects who started the new AS in September , and take Further Maths either all in the academic year or over the two academic years but they may also affect the year group above those who started AS in September and take Further Maths in the year With decision maths, D1 and D2 will completely switch over from January Thus there is no change in unit code for D1 and D2.

See here for further information on the Edexcel changes. It is also possible to study for other qualifications in maths while doing your A Levels.

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