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❶She looked tired, but was patient, simply holding a finger to her lips as her children restlessly waited with her.

Can a Physician Assistant Personal Statement Example Help You?

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PA School Essay Examples Can Help You

At 17, I was able to obtain my licensure and at 18 I landed my first professional job in the medical field as a CNA in an assisted living facility. By the time I resigned from this position 2.

I became so close to some of the patients and their families that I went to many of their funerals and grieved alongside their loved ones.

This job taught me about the cycle of life and the reality of death that I would have to face if I wanted to continue in the medical field. While in college, I learned about a great new opportunity that would give me a new experience with physicians in a completely new setting. After meeting with a representative that visited my college, I became a scribe in the emergency room at Ingalls Memorial Hospital in Harvey, Illinois. This is where I got to experience a fast paced environment where anything and everything could happen.

I learned how different physicians faced each complicated issue and how they could utilize the resources of the hospital and others around them to help their patients. I also learned about the role of a physician assistant, and how they interacted with the physicians and medical staff within the emergency room. Once I transferred hospitals and was promoted to the role of chief scribe at Rush University Medical Center, I was tasked with the need to know who each employee was and what their job entailed.

Each time I would train a new scribe coming in, I would need to introduce them to the other employees and inform them about the different roles they play in the emergency room. Due to this, I became very close with several physician assistants who were my constant supporters. I noticed that the physician assistants were extremely personable and had a love for their job without much burden. I frequently asked the PAs questions about their job and how I could begin a career as a PA, since I always wanted to work in the medical field, but did not know which position I was most interested in.

Every time I learned more about the physician assistants that I worked with, I felt as though it would be the perfect career for me. After 16 years of schooling, it only took me 2 years working with PAs to figure out the many benefits and opportunities that a career in the field would provide me and my family.

My love for medicine, my dedication, and my hard work are all excellent foundations to a career as a PA. Working in several different facilities, in different roles, and with a variety of diverse patients helped me to realize what an impact I could have on my patients and the field of medicine as a Physician Assistant. I appreciate the fact that you posted this.

The first and second drafts of my personal statement was very similar to yours in terms of structure and content. I read the PA School Essay 2 and made quite a few changes to my personal statement as a result. During my sophomore year of college, my grandmother was diagnosed with ovarian cancer. Despite what seemed to be an impending doom, my grandmother, who had already endured excruciating chemotherapy treatments years earlier secondary to colon cancer, emitted optimism as she laid in the hospital bed.

Her eyes glistened as she recounted stories of my grandfather who had passed away years before I had been born, her smile radiating as if it were yesterday. As the weeks progressed, the oncologist informed my family and I that the cancer metastasized to her liver. She contracted nosocomial pneumonia at the end of her battle and I remember my last moment with her; the only audible noise was the whistling from the ventilator.

I grasped her cold hands, staring at them the same way I did as a child. When I was younger, I always wondered why her fingers looked as though they were pushed toward the little finger, not realizing that she had ulnar deviation secondary to rheumatoid arthritis. I would push my fingers in the same direction so that my hand could resemble hers.

I understood that, in the recesses of my soul, there would be an absence. She looked tired, but was patient, simply holding a finger to her lips as the children restlessly waited with her. I organized her laboratory and radiology requests and walked over to her seat in the waiting room.

Her daughter and son were resting now as Maria read a book. It was not until then that I realized wrinkles covered her forehead; they made me wonder if the boy and girl who accompanied her were actually her grandchildren. I discussed with Maria her treatment plan and she simply smiled, shaking her head intermittently.

The necklace closely resembled the one my grandmother gave me shortly before she was admitted to the hospital for the last time.

The most important that I would like to ask you, though, is this: This draft also lacks any mention of the experiences that I have had shadowing or working as a medical scribe. Nonetheless, I feel that, through expanding on my volunteering experience, this version has more heart in comparison to the my other draft.

My other draft is very similar to your PA School Essay 1; it basically outlines everything that has led me to want to pursue a career as a PA. Stephen, I apologize as my previous post is a variation of this draft that I am not as confident with. Please read this draft instead.

Despite what seemed to be an impending doom, my grandmother, who had already endured excruciating chemotherapy treatments years earlier secondary to colon cancer, emitted optimism. Her eyes glistened as she recounted stories of my late grandfather, her smile radiating as if it were yesterday. She contracted nosocomial pneumonia at the end of her battle and I recall my last moment with her; the only audible noise was the whistling from the ventilator.

I was always fascinated by the orientation of her fingers, wondering how they were able to stay pointed toward her little finger, not realizing that she had ulnar deviation—a consequence of rheumatoid arthritis. During this time of grief, I remembered a statement made by my former karate instructor Sensei Mike.

You become a part of a team, a family. She walked back to her seat in the waiting room. She looked tired, but was patient, simply holding a finger to her lips as her children restlessly waited with her.

A story of perseverance and strength. And that could be enough—volunteering at a health center for uninsured, low-income patients—but I would like to extend my hand further. I would like to see each patient not just as they enter and exit through the clinic door, but throughout their entire healthcare journey.

My experience as a medical scribe in the Florida Hospital Lake Mary emergency department has elucidated that the perfect marriage of patient-provider interaction and clinical medicine can be achieved through the PA profession. Kerfala Fofana, PA-C was one of the first providers whom I worked with as a newly hired scribe and exemplified this balance of sciences and personal interaction. He openly consulted the attending physician, whether it was with regards to recommendations on an antibiotic or on admitting a patient to the ICU.

While I lament the lack of time I spent with Kerf, I appreciate his dedication to his patients, notably one of his newest—his mother. Kerf has shown me that sentiment cannot be sacrificed, not matter how full the waiting room becomes.

You work for homecare services. Have you had any contact with PAs in the context of your work? Have you done any shadowing? If you have, write about those experiences and how you were impacted by them. Hopefully you have a better reason to go into healthcare than revenge.

Write about the real reasons. You can link your childhood experience of inadequate treatment to your interest in ensuring that others never experience that pain. Do it from a positive, not a negative standpoint. Completely re-edited my PS.

This draft feels alot stronger. Please let me know what you think. This quote from Mark Twain comes to mind when describing why I aspire to become a Physician Assistant. Why was it important for me to help people through medicine?

Why not a trainer, a physician or a nurse? Why not anything else? Robert Butler described, that could prevent and treat many diseases but more importantly prolong the length and quality of life.

I wondered what I could do to be part of the solution, how I could play a role in delivering a care that considered multiple influences and multiple methods for treating and preventing diseases, while also advocating optimal health and well-being. With the recent reforms to healthcare I believed that a system emphasizing prevention could become an actuality and with many people given access to it a better kind provider would be needed.

Providers, in my opinion, that understands the roles of nutrition, fitness and behavior modifications on health. Providers that understand that curative or palliative methods that wait until patients are sick, in many cases beyond repair before stepping in, can no longer be a standard practice. Each profession has aspects that interest me but as I have researched and dissected each of these careers, plucking pieces where I find my greatest skills meeting what I am passionate about, I found myself at the doorstep of a career as a Physician Assistant.

I thoroughly enjoy my interactions with patients and working in communities where English may not be the primary language but forces you to go out and learn to become a better caregiver. It is in a profession centered on this team-based effort, it focuses on the patient and the trust between the physician and the health care team, not on the insurance, management or the business side of medicine. It is a profession whose purpose comes from improving and expanding our health care system, a field with the ability to not only diagnose and treat diseases but also with the expectation to promote health through education.

Most importantly it is a career whose role in this evolving health care system is etched to be on the front line in its delivery, the key to integrating both wellness and medicine to combat and prevent diseases.

I have been placed on this earth to serve, educate and advocate wellness through medicine as a Physician Assistant. Also, quotation marks always go after punctuation, not before. Now to the heart of the essay. You use valuable space to quote Dr. Butler when you could be talking about your experience. Scrutinize the rest of your essay and cut the philosophy and the rhetorical questions.

The easiest decision I ever made was choosing to play soccer when I was seven years old. Fifteen years later, after finishing four years of Division I collegiate soccer, I made the most difficult decision thus far in my life. Knowing that I was not going to play for the U. The summer after my college graduation, I transitioned from playing soccer to coaching, while figuring out a career path to pursue.

At one of the first practices I coached, I witnessed a girl get caught up in a net and hit her head on a pole. My instincts told me to run over and help. I advised a parent to call while I checked to see if the girl was alert.

She was in and out of consciousness for about two minutes before she was able to look at me and tell me her name.

I talked to her to keep her awake until the paramedics arrived to take over. Even while the paramedics assessed her, she did not want me to leave.

I held her hand until it was time for her to be transported. In that moment, it was clear to me that helping others was my calling. I shadowed emergency room ER doctors, orthopedic doctors, and general practitioners.

Naturally, my athletic career drew me in towards Orthopedics. I spent most of my time watching how doctors, physician assistants PAs , nurses, and technicians interacted with patients. Similar to soccer, teamwork is a key component of patient care. I was amazed at how smooth the process was to prepare for a trauma patient in the ER. It was not as chaotic as I had expected. The communications center alerted the trauma team that a 79 year-old female patient with head trauma was on its way.

From there, the trauma team prepared a room for the patient. When the patient arrived, it was like watching a well-rehearsed play. In that moment, I felt the same adrenaline rush I got during my soccer games and knew that I had to pursue a career in the medical field. Although I was introduced to the idea of becoming a PA, my eyes were set on becoming a doctor.

So, I applied for medical school. After being rejected from medical school, I debated applying again. What stood out the most to me was the flexibility of a PA to work in different medical specialties. Also, in the orthopedic department, I noticed that the PAs had more time to spend with patients discussing rehabilitation options and infection prevention after their surgeries. This type of patient care was more along the lines of what I wanted to do.

Whether the complaints were medical or traumatic, these patients were meeting me on the worst day of their lives. One call we had was a Spanish-speaking only patient who complained of left knee pain.

Since I was the only Spanish speaker on scene, I translated for the paramedics. The medics concluded that the patient could be transported to the hospital code 2, no paramedic follow-up and no lights and sirens necessary, since it appeared to be localized knee pain.

En route to the hospital, I noticed a foul smell coming from the patient. Suddenly, the patient became unresponsive so we upgraded our transport and used our lights and sirens to get there faster. Upon our arrival the patient started coming around.

The triage nurse approached us and noticed the foul smell as well. The nurse had us put the patient into a bed right away and said that the patient might be septic. I thought, but where? Later that day, we checked up on the patient and found out that she was in the late stages of breast cancer. On scene, she failed to mention the open wounds she thoroughly wrapped up on her breasts because that was not her chief complaint. She also did not mention it as part of her pertinent medical history. Her knee was hurting due to osteoporosis from the cancer cells metastasizing to her bones.

This call always stuck with me because it made me realize that I want to be able to diagnose and treat patients. As a PA, I would be able to do both. All of my life experiences have led me to realize that I want to be a part of a medical team as a physician assistant. To be able to study multiple medical specialties, diagnose, and treat would allow me to come full circle in patient care.

As much as I love pre-hospital care, I have always wanted to do more. Given the opportunity, as a PA, I will take on the challenges of patient care in a hospital setting and look forward to being able to follow through with all of my patients to the end of their care. Why make people wonder why you were rejected? Besides, there are a thousand careers you could have that help people — you could be a social worker, for example.

For example, did you notify the triage nurse about the odor? A young, cheerful volleyball player came to my training room complaining of back pain during her off-season. Two weeks later, she died from Leukemia. Two years later her brother, a former state champion football player, was diagnosed with a different type of Leukemia. He fought hard for a year, but he too succumbed to the same disease that took the life of his baby sister. A girl in her sophomore year of high school sought my advice because she was concerned about a small bump on her back.

After a few weeks of observing she returned complaining of back pain along with an increase in the size of the original bump.

Recognizing this was beyond my expertise, I referred her to her pediatrician, who then recommended she see another medical specialist. After recently dealing with the loss of two young athletes, this news was shocking.

Fortunately, over the next year and a half, this young lady battled and beat the cancer in time to complete her senior year and walk across the stage at graduation with her classmates. I was elated for her, but began reflecting on the limitations of my position as an athletic trainer. These events also prompted me to evaluate my life, my career, and my goals. I felt compelled to investigate my options. After doing so, I was determined to expand my knowledge and increase my ability to serve others and decided the correct path for me was to become a Physician Assistant.

During my career thus far as an athletic trainer, I have had the privilege of working at a wide variety of locations. My experiences in these diverse settings have shown me the need for all degrees of medical personnel. Each field has its own purpose in the proper care of the patient. As an athletic trainer I have seen a range of injuries that I could diagnose and treat myself. But it has always been the ones that I had to refer to the team doctor that weighed on me, making me feel that I should be able to help even more.

As a physician assistant, I would possess the knowledge and skills needed to diagnose and provide the care needed for my patients. My position as the high school athletic trainer allows me to get acquainted with all of the athletes, however, to be even more effective I get involved in the community of the school and strive to learn more about the people with whom I work.

For the last three years I have been a substitute teacher for the junior and senior high school. I have also volunteered for many functions that the school provides for the students including school dances, the community-based alcohol prevention program called Every 15 Minutes, and the annual junior and senior retreat which involves a true bonding experience for all participants.

Developing meaningful relationships with the students enhances my effectiveness by opening lines of communication and building trust. It is my firm belief that a patient will only speak openly about a self-perceived flaw including injury with someone he or she feels comfortable.

I sincerely want to be that person for my athletes now, and for my patients in the future. The diverse injuries, illnesses, and diseases I have encountered as athletic trainer have provided me with a variety of wonderful experiences. I have witnessed both tragedy and triumph with my athletes and coaches, on and off of the field or court. Most injuries have been inconsequential in the long term, even to those experiencing the pain in the moment.

They know that they will heal and progress in their sport and continue on their journey in life. Fighting for and winning state championships is all well and good, but there are far more important concerns in this life we live.

I have witnessed young lives being taken, and those who battled relentlessly to overcome all obstacles, and it is these individuals who have changed how I view medicine, how I view myself, and how I view my future in the world of medicine.

These people have enriched my life and have taken ahold of my heart and mind, motivating me to push forward. He was told he would live a much shorter and less satisfying life, but he never gave in to his diagnosis. He made his life what he wanted it to be, overcoming many obstacles and living out his dreams. Seeing him fight for each day of his life has had tremendous influence on me. I know it is my time to fight for what I want and keep moving forward.

Now as to your essay. Yes, it will help you diagnose and treat patients, but so would becoming a doctor. So write more specifically about your reasons for choosing to become a PA. Write about that if it applies. The third and forth paragraph are both good places to cut. My position as the high school athletic trainer allows me to get acquainted with all of the athletes, however, to be even more effective, I strive to learn more about the people with whom I work.

For the last three years I have been a substitute teacher and volunteered at functions. Developing relationships with the students enhances my effectiveness by opening lines of communication and building trust. It is my firm belief that a patient will only speak openly with someone he or she feels comfortable.

I want to be that person. The door flew open and slammed against the adjacent wall. The room was dark and all I could make out were figures and the noise of chatter and children crying. As my eyes adjusted to the sharp contrast in darkness from the blaring sun outside, I made my way to the counter. I took a seat and waited for my turn to be seen at my local health department.

As an adolescent without health insurance, I have seen first-hand the demand for providers that can offer available healthcare. My experiences at the local health department made me dread going, never knowing if I would see the same provider again.

Like many others in my situation, I just stopped going. After these experiences, I knew I wanted to be the stability for the underprivileged and financially burdened. I began my role in healthcare as a pharmacy technician.

It was this job that solidified my interests in the science of medicine. It was also this exposure which showed me that primary care providers play a huge role in the health system. However, it was not until I began working in registration for the Emergency Department of my local hospital that I could see just how important this role is; patients sitting for hours to be seen for a fever and headache because they do not have any other option for healthcare.

These observations pushed me to continue in medicine. After moving home to pursue this career, I climbed my way from a unit secretary to a patient care technician where I had my first hands-on experiences with patients. I remember a particular incident where while I was assisting a patient to the bathroom, she began sweating and complaining of blurred vision. With the nurse by my side, we got Ms.

Kay safely to the bed and began treating her with intravenous glucose. I was so excited and proud of myself for recognizing the symptoms and being able to react without hesitation.

It is moments like this one that I recognize my desires are not only to treat patients, but also diagnose illnesses.

After working closely with many health providers for nearly ten years, none stood out to me like Mike, a physician assistant on the cardiothoracic surgery unit. I have seen him take the extra time to go over every medication a patient had not only to ensure there was no drug interactions but to explain and write down the uses of each for when they returned home.

Understanding these problems and taking the time to address them through patient education and support can greatly improve the quality of life for those in our communities. PAs help to carry out this idea of preventive medicine over episodic care as a team. A team-based care system is very important to me.

I learned the value of a solid support network while struggling after the death of my cousin. The pain of losing my best friend, and the personal disappointment I felt after failing two semesters, made it difficult for me to continue on my career path confidently. However, with the backing and trust of my peers, much like a PA in their practice, I was able to push forward and overcome these trials. I was taught stress-management and determination through these hardships and they will aid me as I endeavor this challenging and evolving career as a PA.

We come from several backgrounds and experiences that allow us to integrate together and ultimately provide better patient care.

I am confident in my ability to translate my skills into my studies as well as future practice and become a successful PA. I am also confident in my ability to relate and help close the gap in available healthcare as a primary care provider. The way you handled your failing grades was deft. I was very sorry to learn the circumstances — the loss of your cousin. The concluding and opening, though, needs some tweaking.

The conclusion could be much stronger. I made my way to the counter. On one, I wrote my name and date of birth. Mary was a patient we brought to and from dialysis three times a week. At the young age of 88, her mind was starting to go and her history of CVA rendered her hemiplegic, reliant on us for transport.

Mary would stare through us and continue conversations with her late husband, insist she was being rained on while in the ambulance, and manipulate us into doing things we would never consider for another patient, i. But, it was Mary, and Mary held a special place in our hearts just out of sheer desire to please her in the slightest- never successfully, might I add. Mary complained about everything, but nothing at the same time.

So, that Thursday afternoon when she nonchalantly stated she had chest pain, it raised some red flags. With a trainee on board, the three man crew opted to run the patient to the ER three miles up the road, emergent, rather than waiting for ALS. I ran the call, naturally, it was Mary, and she was my patient. Vitals stable, patient denies breathing difficulty and any other symptoms. Mary look at me. Increased facial drooping; stoke alert, pulling in now.

We took her straight to CT, and I have not since seen her. Mary was my patient, and everyone knew it. My ambulance is my office.

EMS has given me more experience, hope and disappointment than I could have ever asked for as an undergraduate. It has done nothing short of fuel my desire for advancement in the medical field. So chin up, put your shoulders back, walk proud, strut a little. The scars you bear are the sign of a competitor.

Hope that someone will see past my mediocre GPA and undergraduate transcript, and afford me the second chance I know I deserve. I proved my capability and motivation in high school and my last two years of college when I refocused my goals and plan.

I am ready, prepared, and willing to do whatever it takes to reach my aspiration of providing the highest quality care of which I am capable. After years of dabbling in medical occupations, I have finally found the one I want, and my desire to live and learn has never been stronger. You had me completely engaged until your last paragraph. I had a couple of editing quibbles, but nothing huge. Otherwise, leave all that out.

Instead, talk about why you want to be a PA instead of continuing to do what you do. You never even mention the profession! You write that you never saw Mary again. What a perfect place to talk about how that would be different if you were her PA. You can cut some of the first and second paragraph to make additional room if needed.

I have proven my capability and motivation during my last two years of college when I refocused my goals, and through my professional experiences. I am ready to do what it takes to reach my aspiration of providing the highest quality care of which I am capable. After years of dabbling in medical occupations, I have finally found the one I want.

I have since reworked my essay and would prefer that the second copy be considered if possible. I am about characters over the limit and I am not sure what to cut or where. I also am working on conveying the message of why I want to be a PA and what I can offer that is unique. Any help is greatly appreciated! Most importantly, I learned how much I love coming in to the hospital each day, excited to interact with a wide variety of patients and have a positive impact, no matter how small, in their healthcare experience.

Shadowing in a level II trauma center granted me opportunities to develop my own personal philosophy about patient care, as well as furthered my desire to pursue a career as a PA in this field. My biggest inspiration to become a PA, however, started well before I ever shadowed in a hospital but from something much closer to home.

It was the summer before my final year at Miami when I got the text from my dad. He had been sick for a few weeks and finally went to the hospital for routine blood work. When the results came in, they immediately admitted him to Cleveland Clinic Main Campus. He told me he was fine and not to worry, all while joking about getting a room with the Indians game on, so I believed him. The next morning his tests were back — he had acute lymphoblastic leukemia. His first thirty days of routine high-volume chemotherapy were cut short when he acquired an infection and spiraled into total organ failure.

It was the best present a girl could ask for, but not without its challenges. He was still very weak and wheelchair-bound. He had to take handfuls of pills several times a day, and needed his blood sugar checked before each meal due to the steroids.

The house had to be regularly scrubbed from top to bottom due to his low neutrophil count. When I was younger and my mother suffered two strokes, my father had been the one that had kept our family together. Our upside down world felt like a nightmare. I learned to do fingersticks and insulin injections gently, so as not to bruise his paper-thin skin.

I taught him how to flush his PICC line when it became clogged a trick I learned from my own experience with IV antibiotics to treat osteomyelitis a year prior. I had a tough choice to make: I stayed in Cleveland for as long as I could, but eventually went back to school the day before spring semester started. I continued to come home as often as I could. We now considered ease of access everywhere we travelled to make sure it was safe for his wheelchair. One night, my mother confided that she had never spent so much time with my father in the entirety of their marriage.

Cancer is not only a physical fight but a myriad of battles that accompany the diagnosis. Standing strong with my family through all of these hurdles has helped me to develop a comprehensive and unique perspective on the challenges that health issues bring to patients and their families.

My father has since returned to work in the ER, and continues to greet patients with a smile, grateful to be alive and healthy enough to practice medicine. Even before my father got sick, I was in love with medicine, too. From a young age, I questioned the world around me with a thirst for answers that never waned.

As I learned body systems in anatomy and physiology, I looked at illness and injury as a puzzle waiting to be solved. When I was taking care of my dad, he told me I should look into PA school. While the doctors intercept phone calls from specialists and chart lengthy notes, the PAs are in the room with patients, performing a review of symptoms or suturing lacerations all while keeping the patient informed and calm to ameliorate stress levels. The positive impact on the patient care experience is palpable.

First, I was very relieved to read that your dad is back to work. You and your family have been through extraordinary ordeals. When I interviewed Admissions Directors and faculty from across the country about these essays, they all said they care less about family illness experiences and more about current patient experiences. There are sentences here and there that could be cut to give you room or even to get you down to your CASPA limit if you decide not to add anything.

Here are some examples:. Just by eliminating those few sentences, you gain over characters and spaces. Mary had lived at Lutheran Home for about 5 years. She had the warmest smile that spread across her face and seemed to tell a story. It was a smile that reminded me of the kind smile my grandmother used to have.

I remember thinking that this woman truly amazed me and seemed to have an uncanny ability to comfort others. Mary was a selfless, compassionate woman that I admired very much. One day I learned that Mary had fallen while trying to transfer into the shower and had injured her arm and had hit her head. This incident, followed by more health issues, seemed to be the start to her declined orientation and abilities. Mary was put on bed rest, slowly began to lose her appetite and began to have pain.

For the next few months, I was happy when I was assigned to care for Mary because the statement I had witnessed truly came to life. Mary was not always well taken care of and had no family visitors in her last days. Many times I would try to check in to ensure her comfort, sit with her in my free time or reproach Mary when she had refused a meal to get her to eat a little more. In the end, small things like holding her had, being there for her and talking to her undoubtedly made her day just a little better.

Mary taught me to be patient, respectful and compassionate to each and every person I encounter and I have truly witnessed the improvement that this approach provides in the healing process.

I believe that this manner is essential to being a remarkable physician assistant. I am passionate about relationship building, quality time with people, and the flexibility to be a lifelong learner. I know in my deepest core that this profession is what I am meant to do. Yes I am hardworking, ambitious and a team player, but what makes me distinctly qualified to pursue a professional degree as a physician assistant is my humanity and kindness that I have learned through my experiences.

There are an immeasurable amount of moments that I have experienced in patient care that have inspired my career choice. In memory of Mary, and every patient who has individually touched my everyday life I have found my passion with this humanity. I always take the time to be with my patients, understand their point of view, form a connection with them and give them the best quality care I can possibly provide. I have been involved in direct patient care in different settings for 3 years and find great joy every day I go to work.

Every Admissions Director and faculty member i interviewed about writing these essays said getting the name of the profession wrong is a big red flag. Now to the heart of your essay. First, the good stuff. Now the not so great stuff. If you try to explain what you mean, it will probably not serve you well in the essay, so leave that sentence out.

That would really add depth to your essay. I always spend time with my patients, understand their points of view, form a connection with them, and give them the best quality care I can possibly provide. I was in an unsatisfying relationship, in a career that made me completely miserable, and I suffered from headaches everyday from the stress of dealing with these issues.

I knew I was not where I was supposed to be in life. I freed myself from my unsatisfying relationship. The timing may not have been perfect, as I ended the relationship two months before our wedding, but I know I saved myself years of heartache. Four months after ending my engagement, I was laid off from my job.

Shortly after being laid off, I had a seizure due to the headache medicine that I had been taking everyday prior to being laid off. This confirmed to me that I needed a career change. I have never been at a loss for ambition, but my recent experience gave me pause as to the direction I should go. At first, I dismissed the idea because I knew not only would I have to go back to school, I would have to take challenging classes such as chemistry.

The thought of taking chemistry and math-related classes intimidated me. The fear of financial and academic failure made me consider what I needed and wanted. The length of time in school, the cost of schooling, the level of autonomy, and the ability to explore specialties are a few reasons why becoming a PA is appealing. For a time, I avoided making a decision for fear of making the wrong one.

However, indecision due to fear was robbing me of my time and thrusting into me paralyzing thoughts of what may never happen. In the interest of challenging my fear, I decided to volunteer with a local fire and rescue station to obtain my EMT-B certification. Additionally, I began taking classes that I thought I might struggle with.

Returning to school was not easy. I did have to withdraw from college chemistry my first semester as I was overwhelmed with change. I was a bit rusty and needed to ease into the semester so that I could practice the habits that make me a great student.

Once I found my footing, I enrolled in college chemistry again, and I really enjoyed it. I felt as if my mind was expanding and I was learning things that I once thought I could not easily learn. My confidence soared, and I wondered what all my apprehension and anxiety was about. Obtaining my EMT-Basic certification, volunteering, and returning to school to conquer my most demanding classes to date has been one of the most rewarding decisions of my life.

Becoming an EMT-B has allowed me to learn fundamental healthcare such as conducting patient assessments and history, understanding anatomy and physiology concepts, and communicating with patients.

The EMS field has rendered me more open-minded and tolerant, allowing me to treat people of all different socioeconomic status, education levels, and ethnicities. I have seen a very human side of people I otherwise would not.

I have grown professionally and personally while providing compassionate care to others and pushing myself to an extent that I did not think was possible. In addition, since returning to school I realize that I enjoy confronting my fears and I am better at challenging myself and learning new things than when I was in my teens and twenties. Your essay has some very good writing and information. Still there are things to work on. So you must tell what that experience was.

I did have to withdraw from college chemistry my first semester as I was a bit rusty and needed to practice the habits that make me a great student. Perhaps this story remains so clear on account of her dementia driven repetitiveness, but I suspect it was my emotional response of longing for a calling as strong as hers.

Where we did share the same love of crossword puzzles and literature, I never felt physician was the right career for me- despite her grandmotherly insistence. Today I am confident that Physician Assistant PA is the answer to a question I have been asking myself for a long time now. What will I dedicate my life to? As a student oscillating between a career in medicine and international development it was unclear which path best fit my character and career goals.

Following my passions led me to find the PA occupation. It is a combination of everything I am interested in: This course of study inspired and challenged me as it combined my interest in biology and enthusiasm for problem solving. A Biochemistry course presented more of a challenge than others. I immediately retook the course learning a valuable lesson- that personal growth comes from challenges.

With this lesson in mind I decided to enter post graduate life through the toughest challenge I could imagine- volunteering for two years in a third world country. In an effort to pursue my interest in both health and international development I joined the Peace Corps. Furthermore this allowed me to work for an organization whose philosophy I could believe in. The Peace Corps attempts to make a real difference in the lives of real people. Within months of living in rural Ecuador I took notice and was inspired by the tangible and immediate impact made by medical professionals.

Eager to join them I jumped at the opportunity to collaborate with a rural health clinic. Weave a story that helps the reader understand who you are as a person rather than simply listing your achievements.

Avoid repeating information that is included elsewhere on your application unless you are elaborating on how an experience has shaped you and your motivation for a career as a health professional. Though you are not limited to these examples, some people find it helpful to use one of the following approaches:.

Your opening sentence can simultaneously set the theme of your essay and engage the reader. Here are some different types of leads you may wish to try out:.

State what you will be talking about in the paper. This can take on the form of a "thesis" in many ways i. This lead sets up the reader for a focused, well-structured essay and helps you to get the point quickly infinitely useful in a short essay like the personal statement. Add interest by making the reader wonder what will come next i.

Take the reader into the middle of the action. Reveal something about you i. Begin with a direct quotation or paraphrase whose meaning pertains to the main points you are trying to convey in your essay i. Put the reader into the middle of a conversation, whether it be an actual talk between two people or your own internal thoughts i. State a fact that is relevant to the topic of your essay i. Give your draft to multiple sources to get different perspectives. Clarity in your writing will reflect good communication skills.

By the end of the statement, the reader should be able to see the world through your eyes. The most important part of the personal statement is the impression of yourself that you are creating. After reading your personal statement, readers may ask themselves if you would be interesting to interview.

It is expected that your personal statement be error-free. Grammatical errors may reflect carelessness. Additional Navigation Exploring Health Professions. Year-by-Year Calendar of Activity. Dental Medicine Academic Requirements. Applying to Dental School. Applying to Nursing School.

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This is an unedited sample of PA school essay submissions, meant to provide you with some insight into how other applicants are approaching their CASPA personal statements. 31 Physician Assistant Personal Statement Examples. I am very much attracted to the career of being a Physician Assistant. I want to help as many people as I can.

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Crafting a Winning PA School Application Essay. Posted By: Paul | PA School Essays | 5 Comments. Physician Assistant medicine is a fast growing career track, and it’s not hard to see why. PAs are in great demand due to a national shortage of primary care physicians. Here’s a trick that will help you bone up on the school and the. Stand out. Offering Physician Assistant school personal statement editing by admissions panel members, professors, faculty members, and practicing PAs. Our goal is to ensure your essay paints you as an ideal candidate for PA school.

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My CASPA Personal Statement (as an example) Personal Statement. To be a good sport and to help you get into PA school, I have decided to post my own personal statement. I put a lot of heart and soul into my first essay last year, I feel like it could still make a good base for this year, but not sure of what I should change. I was wondering. Pa School Essay Examples - Launch your new medical career as a Physician's Assistant. Visit us for program details, requirements and locations.