Skip Nav

Yale Law School 2017–2018

Juris Doctor Applicants

❶Yes, it seems like it would be obvious that a word essay should be, well, words.

law school admissions essay service yale

Your Jackpot Could be Waiting!
The 250-Word Albatross
Application Submission

Student Services Student Organizations. Career Development Complete Employement Statistics. Asha Rangappa is the former associate dean of admissions and financial aid for Yale Law School. Her blog, "Ask Asha," which began in , has provided invaluable information about the general dynamics of law school admissions, as well as specific advice for potential applicants to Yale Law School. A full listing of the most popular posts from "Ask Asha," including videos. Studying Law at Yale.

Areas of Interest Degree Programs. Clinical and Experiential Learning Courses. Ruebhausen Fund Orville H. JD Admissions An unmatched environment of excellence and educational intimacy. Home Admissions JD Admissions. When you write your essays and short answer responses, write about something that matters to you. Use your own voice. Do not worry about making a special effort to include impressive vocabulary words or overly complex sentences. If you sound like yourself and discuss something you care about, your essay will be more effective.

Pick topics that will give us an idea of who you are. We have read wonderful essays on common topics and weak essays on highly unusual ones. Your perspective — the lens through which you view your topic — is far more important than the specific topic itself. In the past, students have written about family situations, ethnicity or culture, school or community events to which they have had strong reactions, people who have influenced them, significant experiences, intellectual interests, personal aspirations, or — more generally — topics that spring from the life of the imagination.

Share your essays with at least one or two people who know you well — such as a parent, teacher, counselor, or friend — and ask for feedback. Remember that you ultimately have control over your essays, and your essays should retain your own voice, but others may be able to catch mistakes that you missed and help suggest areas to cut if you are over the word limit.

Interviews are another way to help your application stand out. An interview is not required, but if you are offered the opportunity to interview, we strongly encourage you to take it. Although the interviewer will get the ball rolling with questions, come prepared to be an engaged conversationalist.

Rather than answering a question with a one-word, direct answer, approach each question as an opportunity to elaborate on various aspects of who you are. Share whatever additional information you feel the admissions committee should consider in order to fully appreciate your ideas, intellectual curiosity, character, and values.

Interviewers can also learn about candidates from the interesting, thoughtful questions they bring to the table. Recommendations tell us a great deal about the way you think and learn, how you contribute to your school community, and what you add to a classroom dynamic.

The best recommendations are not always from the teachers in whose class you earned the highest grades, but rather from those teachers who know you best and can discuss the substance of your intellect and character. We are as interested in your intellectual curiosity and resilience as in your innate ability and work ethic. A string of generic superlatives is not as useful as a specific, thoughtful discussion of your strengths.

All applicants for first-year admission should request two letters of recommendation from teachers who have taught the student in core academic subjects: These teachers will best speak to your recent progress, your preparation for rigorous collegiate coursework, and your potential contributions beyond the classroom.

Supplementary materials can provide broader context to some parts of your application, but they can just as often be superfluous and distracting. But a third recommendation that raves about you, just as your other letters do, will not necessarily enhance your application.

In fact, it may dilute the effect of the two required recommendations. For more information visit our page on supplementary materials.

Search form

Main Topics

Privacy Policy

After an applicant is admitted, Yale Law School requires as a prerequisite to matriculation a Dean's Certification Form from each college or university degree program in which an applicant is, or has been, enrolled, regardless of whether a degree was awarded.

Privacy FAQs

Asha Rangappa is the former associate dean of admissions and financial aid for Yale Law School. Her blog, "Ask Asha," which began in , has provided invaluable information about the general dynamics of law school admissions, as well as specific advice for potential applicants to Yale Law School.

About Our Ads

TLS home Law School Admissions Law Schools Law Yale Law School recently shared with us some helpful advice and pointers about applying to their program. We are in the process of scheduling a Yale Admissions How to Tackle Supplemental Law School Essay might encounter is Yale University Law Schools required about the law school. I remember putting off my Yale Law School application because of the , too (good thing that applying late to YLS doesn't affect your chances of admission!). The word essay, in case you haven't checked out our application, is an essay on any subject of your choice, which the Admissions Committee uses "to evaluate an applicant's writing.

Cookie Info

Everyone who applies to Yale Law School must write, in addition to a personal statement, what is affectionately known as the Yale This is a completely open-ended short essay ( words, obviously) on any topic of the applicant’s choice. Sep 03,  · Yale Law School (YLS) requires applicants to submit a word essay on a topic of the applicant's choice. The word essay, also called the 'Yale ' or simply 'The ', gives members of the YLS admissions committee a chance to assess Views: 15K.